Emergency Action/Fire Prevention Plan

Purpose

OSHA's Emergency Action/Fire Prevention Plan, found at 29 CFR 1910.38, requires Principia to have a written plan that addresses emergencies that our company expects may reasonably occur at our facility.

The Emergency Action/Fire Prevention Plan communicates to employees the policies and procedures to follow in dealing with and preventing emergencies. This written plan is available, upon request, to employees, their designated representatives, and OSHA officials.

Our employees will be informed of the plan's purpose, including:

  • Emergency escape procedures and route assignments.
  • Procedures to account for all employees after emergency evacuation has been completed.
  • Rescue and medical duties.
  • Means of reporting fires and other emergencies.
  • Types of evacuations to be used in various emergency situations.
  • Fire prevention activities to include fire hazards, ignition sources, fire protection equipment available, and maintenance practices.
  • Alarm system.

If after reading this plan, you find that improvements can be made, please contact the Safety and Emergency Committee. We encourage all suggestions and are committed to the success of our Emergency Action/Fire Prevention Plan. We strive for clear understanding, safe behavior, and involvement in the plan from every level of our company.

The Workplace Safety and Emergency Committee will review, implement, and update this plan as necessary. Copies of this plan may be obtained from Principia corporate Safety Director's Office or from the local Human Resources Department.

At Principia, various personnel (or their designees) are responsible for specific duties and activities as follows:

Safety and Emergency Committee

  1. Implement the written emergency action/fire prevention plan for regular and after hours work conditions.

     

  2. Conduct drills to acquaint employees with emergency procedures, and to judge the effectiveness of the plan.

     

Facility Manager Responsibilities

  1. Immediately notify local medical facilities, fire, and/or police departments in the event of an emergency affecting the office.

     

  2. Satisfy all local fire codes and regulations.

     

  3. Decide to remain in or evacuate the workplace in the event of an emergency.

     

  4. If evacuation is necessary, the Facility Manager ensures that employees and on-premise vendors and customers are notified of the emergency, and a head count is taken to confirm total evacuation of all employees.

     

Human Resources

  1. Distribute procedures to each employee for reporting a fire, tornado, or other emergencies. Post the location of fire exits, and evacuation routes.

     

  2. Arrange for training of designated employees in the use of fire extinguishers and the application of first aid techniques.

     

  3. Maintain key management personnel telephone numbers in a safe place in the office for immediate use in the event of an emergency. Distribute a copy of the list to key persons to be retained for use in communicating an emergency occurring during non-work hours.

Emergency Escape Procedures, Assignments, and Accountability

Our emergency escape procedures and assignments are designed to respond to many potential emergencies. Employees need to know what to do when they are the first persons to discover an emergency and when they are alerted to a specific emergency.

We have developed the following guidelines for responding to emergencies, depending on what the emergency is. The guidelines are as follows:

  1. All employees are trained in safe evacuation procedures, and training is conducted whenever the employee's responsibilities or designated actions under the plan change, and whenever the plan itself is changed. In addition, we review with each employee, upon initial assignment, the parts of the plan the employee must know to protect themselves, our vendors and customers, in the event of an emergency.

     

  2. The training includes use of floor plans and workplace maps which clearly show the emergency escape routes. Color coding aids employees in determining their egress and refuge routes. These floor plans and maps are posted at all times in conspicuous areas of the company to provide guidance in an emergency.

     

  3. As a matter of general practice, demarcated exits are the primary means for evacuation. These egress paths must be maintained free of obstacles at all times.

     

  4. No employee is permitted to re-enter the building until advised by the Facility Manager (after determination has been made that such re-entry is safe).

     

  5. Refuges/safe zones are established for our facility with designated representatives for assigned accountability.

     

  6. Designated personnel will conduct head counts once evacuation has been completed and they are sure all vendors, customers and employees, who may be trapped or otherwise unable to evacuate the area, have exited the work area. Once employees, vendors and customers are accounted for, the trained evacuation personnel will report to and inform the Facility Manager of successful evacuation or problems.

     

  7. There is at least one trained evacuation person for each twenty employees, vendors and customers in the workplace to provide adequate guidance and instruction at the time of an emergency. The employees selected are trained in the complete workplace layout and the various alternative escape routes from the workplace. All trained personnel are made aware of employees with disabilities and vendors as well as customers who may need assistance.

Rescue and Medical Duty Assignments

Rescue and first aid may be necessary during emergency situations. Such aid will be provided by the first responders for emergencies. These responders are trained in first aid/CPR and will generally consist of public emergency services summoned by dialing 911. Professional emergency services responding in an emergency will help with and direct all rescue and medical duty assignments upon their arrival on site.

Emergency Reporting Procedures

In the Event of a Fire

  1. Verbally notify employees in the immediate area.

     

  2. Go to the nearest manager with a bull horn (Manfred Romer or Keith Burke) and ask them to notify facility occupants.

     

  3. Immediately dial 911, to summon emergency services, if required.

     

  4. Initiate Emergency Action/Fire Prevention Plan to evacuate building or affected sections of the building.

     

  5. Trained evacuation personnel will perform their assigned duties and direct employees and vendors and customers to a safe upwind location that will not impede emergency responders.

     

  6. Trained evacuation personnel will report to the Facility Manager with evacuation results.

     

  7. The Facility Manager shall interface with emergency services to inform them of the nature, location and severity of the fire, and the status of the evacuation of the affected facility.

In the Event of a Tornado

In the event of a tornado, it is our policy to provide emergency warning and shelter.

  1. When a tornado watch has been issued by the National Weather Service, the tornado sirens will sound. At that point, the Facility Manager or his designee will turn on the scanner or other acceptable media device to monitor the National Weather Service reports. The Facility Manager will use the bull horns to warn employees, vendors and customers of an impending tornado.

     

  2. Trained evacuation personnel will perform their assigned duties and direct all employees, vendors and customers to the designated shelter areas.

     

  3. Trained evacuation personnel will report to the Facility Manager with employee, vendor and customer accountability status.

     

  4. Once the threat, or actual tornado, has passed, emergency services should be summoned, if necessary, by dialing 911.

     

  5. The Facility Manager shall interface with emergency services to inform them of the nature, location and severity of the fire, injuries, or trapped individuals, and the status of the evacuation of the affected facility.

In the Event of a Large Spill

  1. Notify facility occupants using the nearest fire alarm station or the bull horns.

     

  2. If required, immediately dial 911 to summon emergency services.

     

  3. Initiate Emergency Action/Fire Prevention Plan to evacuate the building or the affected building section(s).

     

  4. Do not respond to or attempt to stop the spill unless you have received specialized training in emergency response or the spill can be safely cleaned up utilizing techniques and methods found on the MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheet).

     

  5. Trained evacuation personnel will perform their assigned duties and direct employees, vendors and customers to a safe upwind location that will not impede emergency responders.

     

  6. Trained evacuation personnel will report to Facility Manager with evacuation results.

     

  7. The Facility Manager shall interface with emergency services to inform them of the nature, location and severity of the spill, and the status of the evacuation of the affected facility.

In the Event of an Earthquake

  1. In the event of an earthquake, Initiate Emergency Action/Fire Prevention Plan to evacuate the building.

     

  2. Trained evacuation personnel will perform their assigned duties and direct employees, vendors and customers to upwind location that will not present a threat from unsafe structures nor impede emergency response services.

     

  3. If unable to evacuate from the premises due to the severity of the earthquake, seek shelter under desks and/or doorways.

     

  4. Trained evacuation personnel will report to Facility Manager with employee, vendor and customer accountability status.

     

  5. Once the earthquake has subsided, emergency services should be summoned, if necessary, by dialing 911.

     

  6. The Facility Manager shall interface with emergency services to inform them of the nature, location and severity of any fire, injuries, trapped individuals, or gas/chemical spills and the status of the evacuation of the affected facility.

Workplace Fire Hazards, Ignition Sources, Control Methods, and Fire Protection Equipment

Fire prevention measures must be developed for all fire hazards found. Once employees are made aware of the fire hazards in their work areas, they must be trained in the fire prevention measures developed and use them in the course of their work. Additionally, fire protection equipment located in the workplace must be readily accessible, identifiable, and properly serviced and maintained to fulfill its intended purposes and to satisfy local fire codes.

Potential ignition sources identified at Principia, which could potentially lead to workplace fires, are as follows:

  1. Electrical equipment developing ground faults or short circuits.

     

  2. Heat generated by friction of overheated parts or machinery.

     

  3. Open flames and sparks created by welding and cutting operations.

     

  4. Smoking or matches near ignitable materials.

     

  5. Spontaneous ignition of oily waste or rags.

     

  6. Combustibles exposed to heat from normally hot surfaces.

     

  7. Static sparks during transfer of flammable liquids.

     

  8. Ignition sources from lightning or other natural acts.

To prevent and/or reduce the possibility of these potential sources of ignition from manifesting themselves into workplace fires, Principia takes the following precautions:

  1. Control electrical ignition sources by routinely inspecting and maintaining electrical equipment in the workplace.

     

  2. Control friction sources by appropriately lubricating, inspecting, and maintaining all mechanical equipment in the work place.

     

  3. Remove combustible materials a radius of 35 feet, or use fire resistant barriers, during all welding and cutting operations.

     

  4. Perform general housekeeping to limit accumulations of combustible waste and scrap.

     

  5. Provide approved containers for disposal of oily rags and materials subject to spontaneous combustion.

     

  6. Avoid the use of highly flammable liquids when other substitutes are available.

     

  7. Store flammable liquids in approved self-closing containers.

     

  8. Utilize bonding and grounding techniques when transferring Class 1A flammable liquids.

     

  9. Remove and control all ignition sources when using flammable and combustible liquids.

     

  10. . Limit the amount of flammable and combustible liquids stored and used in the work place.

     

  11. Anticipate and control flammable liquid spills in the workplace.

     

  12. Always handle flammable liquids with extreme caution.

     

  13. Provide and ensure operation of fire prevention equipment per local codes.

Once hazards are evaluated and fire prevention equipment is installed to control them, the equipment must be monitored on a regular basis to make sure it continues to function properly. The equipment that Principia utilizes in the workplace consists of the following:

  1. Approved multi-purpose fire extinguishers appropriately distributed, of sufficient size, and properly rated for the fire hazards of the workplace locations.

     

  2. Properly designed wet and/or dry sprinkler systems.

     

  3. Maintenance activities are conducted internally and externally, by competent individuals and organizations, to ensure the following:
    • Portable fire extinguishers are subject to monthly visual checks for integrity of extinguisher and that extinguishers are charged, readily identifiable, and accessible.
    • Portable fire extinguishers receive annual maintenance checks and that records of such are maintained for a minimum of 1 year.
    • Sprinkler systems are tested and maintained in accordance with local codes and ordinances.

Training

Emergency Action/Fire Prevention Plan

At the time of an emergency or fire, employees should know what type of evacuation is necessary and what their role is in carrying out the plan. In cases where the fire is large, total and immediate evacuation of all employees, vendors and customers is necessary. In smaller fires, a partial evacuation (of employees not essential to the containment or response), with a delayed evacuation of others, may be all that is necessary.

We must be sure that employees know what is expected of them during an emergency or fire to assure the their safety and that of our vendors and customers. To achieve this goal, we must conduct training for all of our employees on the plan's content and its requirements.

Training, conducted on initial assignment, includes:

Emergency Action

  • What to do if employee discovers a fire
  • Demonstration of alarm
  • How to recognize fire exits
  • Evacuation routes
  • Assisting employees with disabilities
  • Measures to contain fire (e.g., closing office doors, windows, etc. in immediate vicinity)
  • Head count procedures
  • Return to building after the "all-clear" signal

Fire Prevention

  • Types of fires and control measures
  • Types and use of fire prevention equipment
  • Location of fire prevention equipment
  • How to use fire prevention equipment (if applicable)
  • Limitations of fire prevention equipment (if applicable)
  • Proper care and maintenance of assigned fire prevention equipment (if applicable)

If any member of the Safety and Emergency Committee has reason to believe that an employee does not have the understanding or skills required, the employee must be retrained by reviewing this program and its requirements.

Human Resources, or designated representative, must document in writing that employees have received and understand the required Emergency Action/Fire Prevention Plan training.

Failure to comply with company policies concerning the Emergency Action/Fire Prevention Plan can result in OSHA citations and fines, employee/customer injury, and can lead to disciplinary action up to and including termination.